fermentation

We often overlook fermented vegetables as a rich source of good bacteria.
About three decades ago, something devastating happened in Brazil. An infectious disease had struck the cacao trees and threatened to wipe out the population. Some 70% of these plants fell victim to this deadly ailment. The industry faced decimation. Officials tried to stop the progression but it was hopeless. The situation was becoming dire. If something wasn't done, chocolate was surely going to disappear. Researchers went into the fields of Brazil in the hopes of saving one of the most beloved foods on Earth.
It was believed that if the couple drank the honey-based mead on a regular basis throughout the first moon of their marriage it would bring them luck and fertility. More specifically, drinking the mead allegedly ensured that the woman would become pregnant within their first year of marriage.
From cool cocktails to nutrient-rich smoothies, let's get to sippin' with these easy to make at-home recipes that are also perfecting for summer entertaining!
It's the middle of the holiday season and despite the promises of comfort and joy many Canadians will be dealing with a plethora of less than cheery emotions. There is a route to help keep the stressors at bay that doesn't involve very much effort; all one has to do is eat or drink fermented foods.
There is another significant contributor to terroir although never given its due credit: microbes. Soil is rich with a combination of bacteria, viruses, and fungi. For years, this variation, particularly in yeasts, has been thought to contribute to the unique taste and flavour of a wine region. But, until recently, no one quite knew how.
Last week, a team of Malaysian scientists introduced a fermenting bacterium with the ability to protect food without the need for batches. Based on the results of the study, in the future, all that may be needed is a quick spray and the food would be safe from microbial spoilers.
Smoothies have been all the rage for some time with prominent celebrities boasting about their nutritional value. So if you've ever tried to make a smoothie but felt terrible afterwards, you're not alone. So if you can relate and have always wondered "why do smoothies hurt my stomach?" then I've got a couple solutions just for you.
I was at my usual organic grocer, owned by a Korean family. I mentioned needing daikon for my kimchi and the women at the checkout were all excited that I was going to attempt this. I asked what their best tips were. They both giggled and told me their best tip was to buy some already made.
Smoked cabbage. Savoury beignets. And pickled cauliflower. These are among the foods predicted to become popular in 2015