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Fifty

The transition from working 40 hours a week can be overwhelming if you don't have a plan.
Why shouldn't our 50s be one of the most exciting decades, personally and professionally?
Here's what older adults have to gain by making naps part of their routine.
Growing old gracefully is not just a matter of coasting into the sunset - it's constantly treading water. Elite runner and writer Jean-Paul Bedard shares how his philosophy of movement, gratitude and forgiveness helps him to stay young at heart and mind despite a difficult past.
"Wow, you're old, Mom." Ever since I turned 50, a scant three years ago, my kids have uttered this out loud many, many times, as if I need convincing of the fact. I don't necessarily feel that I'm in my 50s, most of the time. But when I hear people saying that 50 is the new 40, it makes me laugh out loud.
It took me two years of planning in the form of mulling, soul-searching and researching (even though on the outside it came as a surprise to everyone). Once you have done this work, though, the change happens fast and it simply won't go back in the box.
I'm often asked what I enjoy most about retirement with the unstated assumption that it must have something to do with pursuing new passions, travelling the globe or writing the great North American novel. But they're really not up my alley.
What is it that holds us back? Sometimes it's something quite practical -- like the two herniated disks in my lower back -- or the fact that I've had four children and even a sneeze can result in something embarrassing. But sometimes it's not wanting to get out of our comfort zone.
I'm so old, I got over being called "Ma'am" about 20 years ago when I turned 30. Holy crap. I was 30, 20 years ago? Man, math sucks on so many levels.