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finances

With little or no family income to support the "mandatory" back-to-school shopping spree that has come to be expected, what's a parent to do?
At last count, there were 266,620 enrolled across the country, according to Statistics Canada.
Keep track of your expenses for two weeks and see how it lines up to your budget. It can be eye-opening to see where you're spending your money! Little things like bringing your lunch instead of buying it and brewing your own coffee at home instead of stopping on the way to work can add up. Walking or riding your bike to work can help you save on gas and parking while getting fit.
I don't want a four per cent raise. I want better learning conditions for our students and better working conditions for us. Most of all, I want to work on regaining the trust of the public again. Ontario has the greatest sub sovereign debt in the world. I don't want to leave that legacy for my own children or for my students.
Taking a proactive, calm and collected approach to your finances has many benefits. But sometimes it's easier said than done. What are some strategies to reduce the impact of financial stress?
While the federal government is trying to rein in some of the borrowing that's taking place by making it more difficult to borrow, every one of us should take heed -- interest rates will rise. I believe the most important thing individuals should be doing is locking in their mortgages (ideally for five years).
Is it better to sell or should your renovate? The answers here. From the AOL Partner Studio
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With the average price of a detached home out of most first-time buyers' reach, those with less than $1 million to spend have a few options. A lot of people are becoming creative with their buying power and choosing to utilize more unusual or unconventional options to solve the issue of affordability.
When disaster strikes, the costs -- both emotionally and financially -- can be significant. While it's impossible to predict when and where the next emergency scenario or disaster may strike, the principles of preparedness remain the same.
When you make a will, you decide who is going to get your money in the event of your death. The hope is that you not only set up the next generation for financial success, but you also pass along positive financial values they can carry throughout their lifetime.