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First Nations Housing

Indigenous social housing providers want the federal government to rethink plans.
Time and time again the issue of the First Nations housing crisis makes it into the media. And every time I see it I ask myself why things aren't done right the first time. The mouldy, boarded up, plastic-covered shacks are literally third-world, yet they are considered housing rather than something to be bulldozed.
A First Nations person on reserve does not enjoy fee simple ownership and does not have the same property rights as all other Canadians who live off reserve. According to the Indian Act, First Nations reserve land is held in trust for on-reserve members by the federal government -- essentially making on-reserve First Nations people wards of the state.
"It's so crazy that none of us, aboriginal or not, we couldn't survive if the system starts to fall down. We ought to be able to make our own homes."
To suggest Harper has consulted with First Nations leaders because of the meeting on Friday is simply ridiculous. First Nations know the realities of what they are facing and the Conservatives' dishonest talking points, aimed at convincing average Canadians they are making progress, are further undermining what little credibility they have with Canada's indigenous population.
Private-sector help and innovative designs are making headway in improving substandard housing in Canada's North, says a
One of the most prevalent and enduring myths out there is that aboriginal peoples receive "free houses." I think it's useful to acknowledge that there are different understandings of whether native housing is a right. Part of learning about issues like housing, or education, or treaties is in understanding that aboriginal peoples do not necessarily agree with the Canadian state about how things were, are, or should be.
Regional Grand Chief Stan Louttit says five families living in tents on the Northern Ontario reserve should be able to move
"This government has spent some $90 million since coming to office just on Attawapiskat," he told the Commons on Tuesday
As the Canadian Red Cross prepares to send aid to the northern Ontario Cree community of Attawapiskat this week to help it