flu vaccine

But vaccine rates among pregnant women remain low.
Prepare yourself Canada, flu season is coming.
Scientists say it's time to create a universal vaccine.
We are seeing a lot more activity this year compared to last year's flu season, which was relatively mild. It's important to understand that the flu strain circulating each year can change every flu season.
Seniors are the most significantly affected. In Canada, seniors represent 15 per cent of our population, yet account for up to 40 per cent of all influenza infections, the majority of all hospitalizations and deaths from influenza. Why? Because seniors are more likely to be frail and have chronic medical conditions that put them at high risk for influenza and its complications.
I know the flu vaccine doesn't fully protect me or my family from getting the flu. It is just one of the many strategies that I use during flu season to keep us healthy like frequent hand washing, adequate rest and a balanced diet. Vaccination decisions are a touchy subject for many people, so here's a snapshot of recent research..
It has been recognized for many years that people 65 years and older are at greater risk of serious complications from the flu compared with young, healthy adults because our immune defenses become weaker with age. While flu seasons can vary in severity, during most seasons, people 65 years and older bear the greatest burden of severe flu disease.
Truth: The flu shot doesn't cause the flu.
The flu is an acute respiratory infection that brings along a fever, cough, chills, aches and pains, and can lead to serious complications like pneumonia. For the elderly, pregnant women, chronically ill or young children, influenza can be deadly. It kills around 3,500 people per year in Canada.