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food labels

The company now owes reimbursement money to American consumers.
Health Canada should use a more global approach looking at consumers' habits and relationships with food rather than singling out nutrients.
GMOs have the potential to irreversibly alter the genetic core of the food supply. It is very worrying that Health Canada seems more concerned about jumping on the industry bandwagon by trying to convince the unwilling public about the perceived benefits of GMOs than actually carrying out its own safety studies.
The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), which is tasked with enforcing counterfeit food laws, has not historically punished violators to the full extent of its powers, instead frequently choosing to work alongside Canadian food businesses to help them get back into compliance. But, a recent high-profile prosecution involving food fraud has demonstrated that this permissive and reconciliatory approach to regulatory breaches may have come to an end.
Walking towards the mirror I was sure I had a stray lash or speck of dust in my eye; it was extremely itchy. But my face paled at the sight of my lower eyelid, swollen, red, and throbbing. Next was my lower lip on the same side; the interior buzzing with irritation and puffing up against my teeth.
For the second time since 2007, Canada's nutrition labels are being revised. While the new labels are an important step in the right direction, I've broken down the good and the bad of what I feel, as a dietitian, are the most important changes on the labels.
As January comes to an end, those who vowed to eat better in 2015 have probably already given up. Not very surprising, considering that most people grossly underestimate the amount of calories they consume, and underestimate their fat, salt and sugar consumption, even after consulting nutrition labels.
Health Canada estimates that 88 per cent of our salt intake comes from packaged foods so simply putting away the salt shaker isn't the solution. Packages contain a "% Daily Value" amount that is too high so it obscures the facts. Most health care professionals recommend around 1500 mg per day as a maximum.
Changing the nutritional labeling of beer is not what this Canadian Food Inspection Agency consultation is about. It's about modernizing the definition of beer so that good beers don't get caught up in regulatory black holes. The proposed regulations are clean and clear for the industry.
The topic of genetically engineered crops is not new. They were first introduced into Canada 15 years ago, with four crops -- canola, corn, soy and sugar beets -- which now dominate the food industry. Today it's estimated that more than 70 per cent of the products you purchase at your local grocery store contain genetically modified ingredients.