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foreign affairs

Governments should not be conducting sensitive diplomatic negotiations or applying pressures via these platforms.
The challenge for Canadian foreign policy is to mitigate the risks of the rebels faltering in Aleppo, with the more long-term strategic challenge of Russia and Iran's vicious play for power. Should Aleppo fall, an even more dystopian region will emerge.
More than half of the world's child deaths occur in fragile places like South Sudan and Afghanistan. Yet Canada only commits 25 per cent of its official development budget to these areas. To go the distance to reach the world's most vulnerable people, the figure needs to change.
The term reportedly angers the so-called Islamic State.
Christine Lagarde will now be facing a trial in France for "negligence" after allowing a compensation payment of close to US$600 million to a French politician and businessman. Canadians would not accept that a politician, being tried for something like this, remain in power while the trial was going on.
We have to recognize that, as a rising super power, China does not always have to do what Canada wants it to do. Our press has to stop getting into the habit of being self-indulgent or exhibiting a moral superiority complex.
The United Nations created 17 Sustainable Development Goals, or Global Goals, in September 2015 for corporations and countries to guide them toward inclusive and sustainable societies. Undeniably, these global goals appeared optimistic and, for some, bordered on the impossible.
"Responsible conviction" is a strange combination of words that summarizes the guiding principle that the new Foreign Affairs Minister Stéphane Dion is proposing to follow in order to fulfill his mandate. However, Mr. Dion didn't say a word on how the "responsible conviction" can help cases of Canadians detained abroad.
Questions about the dubious eligibility of Saudi Arabia as a recipient of Canadian-made military equipment have been raised for over two years. Yet two successive governments have failed to address the most basic question: how can the authorization of this deal be consistent with the human-rights safeguards of Canadian export controls?
Openness and transparency permeates the mandate letters issued to members of cabinet by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and is a recurring theme in statements by his government. In fact, it is the only theme next to climate change so far. But what does openness mean for development assistance?