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foreign ownership

They want the province to be less attractive for people to anonymously "hide wealth."
Much like last year's Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp.'s condo survey, which showed that investment condos owned by locals in Toronto and Vancouver are a long-term commitment with the objective of generating rental income, this year condominium investors display stable characteristics over time.
The most commonly repeated explanation for the price surge last year and into 2016 is an increase in foreign buyers, especially Chinese buyers looking to launder their ill-gotten funds. Anecdotal evidence of this happening is at record high, but actual data to support it is severely lacking.
High price-to-rent and price-to-income ratios don't signal overvaluation, an overabundance of property speculation, or impending doom. Perhaps they actually signal the ascension of Toronto and Vancouver into the highest of global ranks.
Canada’s realtors “don’t have any method to capture foreign activity in the Canadian real estate markets with any kind of
Over the last year, we've seen the CRTC publish customer-friendly new rules for wireless, set up a special task force to investigate extortionate roaming fees, and start a conversation with Canadians about the Future of Television (and watching TV content online!) Things are starting to change.
Foreign investment is a win-win-win-win proposition for countries, consumers, the economy and shareholders. The only losers? Companies who dislike competition -- or people who think Warren Buffett poses an existential threat to Alberta.
Will the government cave under this pressure? We're hoping they won't -- after all, they've made a clear promise to Canadians to lower prices, a promise underlined personally by Prime Minister Harper at his party's convention last fall. We intend to hold the government to its promises. But already there are worrying signs, with Industry Minister Moore seemingly changing his tune.
It's no wonder that so many Canadians are speaking out about the state of our broken wireless market. We pay some of the highest prices in the industrialized world for often terrible cell phone service. Thankfully it looks like decision-makers are finally starting to take notice.
One of the things we at OpenMedia.ca have been calling for is for wireless companies like Ting to be able to reach Canadians just like indie ISPs like Distributel, Acanac, Start or Teksavvy, just to name a few, do for wired Internet. At the moment Canadians are blocked by the Big Three from using Ting, which I think is wrong.