Fransi Weinstein

Very sadly, large numbers of Canadians are turning their backs on the principles and values I hold dear, the principles and values of which I am so proud. The principles and values that paved the way for my family, and so many others, to have that better life they craved.
I don't know about you, but I have no desire to wake up one morning and find that Kevin O'Leary, Canada's version of Donald Trump, is our new prime minister. If you're not taking him seriously, you should be.
More and more I hear Canadians making mean and disparaging comments about those who disagree or have different points of view. I also hear racist remarks, which is terribly distressing. It's not who we are as a nation. Some of the things said after the shooting at the Mosque in Quebec made me feel like I was at a Trump rally. And I'm not ashamed, or afraid, to say I don't like it.
Don't know about you, but I'm really loving the fact that U.S. citizens and CEOs (in ever increasing numbers) are standing up to Donald Trump, calling him out, defying him and fighting back. And it doesn't look like they have any plans to give up any time soon.
I am not surprised in the slightest that Trump wasted no time in taking the preliminary steps to get rid of Obamacare, to build the wall along the Mexico - U.S. Border and to ban Muslims. It's exactly what he said he'd do throughout his entire campaign. In fact, I would have been shocked if he'd backed away from any of it, or even waited for the Obama's plane to take off for Palm Springs before getting started.
It matters not a whit whether or not Donald Trump influenced Alexandre Bissonnette. What matters is that neither Donald Trump or Alexandre Bissonnette reflect Canada's beliefs or values.
What we have here is a man who wants desperately -- make that has a desperate need -- to be taken seriously, to be revered, respected and adored. And yet he undermines himself at every turn. Donald Trump is his own worst enemy; and he's either too stupid, or too irrational, or too plain crazy to figure it out. He humiliates himself. He makes himself a laughing stock. He's turned himself into a global joke.
Americans, and in fact the rest of the world, can no longer remain passive participants in how our cities and countries are run. Everyone has to speak up. And not just once, at an award show either. Every day, in every way. In emails, letters and voice mails to elected officials, by signing petitions, by marching locally and in our nations' capitals (peacefully) and on our own social media.
The last eight years have hardly been America's finest. Through it all, however, this family has stood tall -- resolute, proud, dignified. Never letting on how hurt, how insulted, how devastated, how disappointed and yes, how justifiably angry they must have been, may still be, may always be.
Here we are, mere days into a new year. On the first day of 2017 there were already 264 incidents of gun violence in the U.S. -- with at least 64 people killed and 146 injured. As of January 5 those numbers rose to 500 shootings, 113 deaths and 288 injuries. If, like me, you had hopes that, if Hillary Clinton became president, we might at last see some much-needed, long-overdue gun control in the U.S. we can certainly forget about it now. Not with Donald Trump as president.