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Fraser River

Three years ago, Mount Polley mine dumped 26 billion liters of waste into Hazelton Creek, Polley Lake and Quesnel Lake.
The salmon farming industry has long been banned in Alaska, where it's believed to be a threat to the state's healthy wild salmon populations. But that's not the case in Canada, where Norwegian-owned aquaculture multinationals have done a terrific job of winning over the federal government.
British Columbians are facing increased water restrictions as abnormally hot and dry weather continues across the province. But people aren't the only ones impacted by these uncomfortable conditions: salmon in the Columbia and Fraser rivers are also bearing the brunt of the blistering climate.
The woman was taken to hospital Sunday night but her husband has yet to be found.
Abbotsford police say a person walking along the Fraser River off Walters Street in north Abbotsford around 8 a.m. PT Sunday
The record decline in sockeye returning to the Fraser River in 2009 provided the initial push for a federal judicial inquiry. Now, four years later, the offspring of those salmon are returning to spawning grounds in dismally low numbers -- so low that sockeye salmon fishery closures are widespread. What happened to Justice Bruce Cohen's 75 carefully crafted recommendations to rebuild Pacific salmon?
The Cohen report is a gift; a well-researched and valuable tool by which to recover wild salmon, not only the Fraser River sockeye runs, but salmon populations across B.C. But its recommendations must be implemented, funded and enforced. The ball is now in the court of the federal government.
Water levels on B.C.'s upper Fraser River have peaked, putting several Fraser Valley communities under evacuation alerts
The 670 kilometre B.C. portion of this proposed pipeline would include 591 water crossings, 532 of which are fish bearing. Should British Columbians be concerned? Those deliberating on whether they support the pipeline would do well to remember this truism: in gambling, the many must lose in order that the few may win.
Despite the knowledge that many species depend on salmon, humans have never managed fisheries with wildlife in mind. A salmon can enter a fishing net or the mouth of a grizzly bear, but can we manage for the interests of both?