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gen x

You now have clout in the workplace, and lots of it.
Last week a Portland, Maine school went viral for teaching Millennials "adulting." Adulting, for those of you who don't know
Loyalty is quite a buzzword around the workplace these days. Employers are continually seeking those committed individuals who want to learn and grow within a company and who see themselves staying in the same place (ideally in a new position, or two) for a lengthy period of time.
It must be a struggle, having to listen to scary words you don't like from little people you don't respect. Almost like you don't think you should have to listen, by virtue of your hard-won experience of giving up on anything but the bottom line, and wish that all of us employee-children would just be quiet and respect you.
If you are able to appreciate your family, friends, colleagues and the blessings you have received without constantly looking over the wall to see if the grass is greener on the other side, you may have actually found happiness. So, why are so many people unhappy?
I think that there are times where there is too much chatter, assumption and stereotyping against Millennials, Gen X and Baby Boomers. Rarely have I seen psychographics, infographics or descriptions that say "likely to," "can" or "may be predispositioned to" when it comes to behaviours. Instead, they are often written as facts and absolutes.
Telling your parents, be they Boomers or Gen Xers, that they 'had it easy' isn't fair. It negates the hard work we all did to get to where we are, and puts it all down to luck and advantage, and ignores what I believe are two main ingredients for success: motivation, and initiative.
Millenials aren't the only ones with nutrition issues. With major life changes involving kids, finances, and jobs, Generation X is getting into a bit of nutritional hot water. This is how.
For those critics out there, a recent study by PsychTests, a Montreal-based psychological testing company, showed that contrary to popular belief, millennials are ambitious and scored higher than boomers on their desire to reach a major goal, such a making a big sale or designing an innovative product.
In the world we are living in today, the modern man is complex and if we cannot make the effort to understand them then how will we ever start to get there? Is it just about selling product, or can advertising now be a tool for which we guide lifestyles? Can we show the modern man that he can share on social, that he can be a stay-at-home father and that he can evolve his role?