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gender equity

These next few days are like festival season for political people: in Winnipeg the Liberal Party is gathering for the 2016 Biennial Convention while over in Vancouver, the Conservative Party are also in the midst of their national convention. Gender equity and increasing the number of female candidates will be a hot topic for both. PM Trudeau and his core team have this made this a clear priority for this Liberal Party and for the Conservatives, a more gender inclusive party has to be an essential part of their renewal efforts.
One-off symbolic gestures such as appointing gender-balanced cabinets are not enough. Like the dozens of other countries ahead of us on the international gender equality league tables have discovered, the only way to move toward gender parity in parliament is to enact laws to prompt parties into action.
Renewable energy employed 7.7 million people globally in 2014 -- an 18 per cent increase from the previous year. Employment in the sector is expected to continue growing in the future. Applying a gender lens to the enthusiasm for renewables reveals a major blind spot since women are marginalized globally in employment in the sector.
One of the key factors in achieving the end of AIDS is one of the most challenging -- gender equality. We need to go beyond the science of HIV care to the larger issues of social structures that create vulnerabilities to HIV.
Early in my career, employment equity took hold. It caused much bitter complaining that such human resource department meddling had no place in the meritocracy we called our workplace. The latest resurrection of these arguments is fuelled by Justin Trudeau's promise to have equal gender representation in Cabinet.
I know that many of us feel hurt when men in general are blamed for violence against women. And many of us have or do feel the need to exclaim, "not all men!" And its true, not all men hurt women. And some of us have been hurt by women. But I encourage, implore, beg and hope all men will consider, just consider, what it means to walk through the world with the privilege of being seen as a man.
The patriarchy has suffered a few punches lately, at least in Toronto this year. But I think it's safe to say that the patriarchy is doing just fine, thank you very much. There's still a lot of work to be done to even the playing field in the business and political world.
This year, when I was invited to join World Neighbors on a physically challenging trip to visit the forgotten people in the poorest regions of Peru, I admit, I was very hesitant. Then I realized I was being offered an opportunity to test my physical resilience after literally being unable to even walk up a short flight of stairs. The only answer was "Yes." Always my philosophy.