generosity

Do we want to only wait to give when there is a big problem? It's time to take a look in the mirror and ask ourselves what kind of Canada we want to be.
Despite their best charitable impulses, citizens watch as poverty grows, mental-health cases mushroom and jobs vanish. In such a setting it remains hard to believe that individuals can make a difference. Except they can, of course.
Ooh, couples, what is it that really breaks our heart? A lack of joy. It doesn't matter if we're embroiled in anger and blame, or frozen out by cold and distant withdrawal. Couples in crisis are not experiencing joy, either individually or together.
This week, while all eyes are on New York City where world leaders are meeting for the General Assembly of the United Nations, another exciting event is taking place: UNICEF Canada and the women of The 25th Team are also gathered in New York to discuss global issues.
We all have stories of moms who've gone to extraordinary lengths to provide for and protect their children. But we all need a little help sometimes, and often, the most courageous thing many of us can do is ask for it. This Mother's Day, World Vision is asking you to consider helping a mother in need. She might be your next-door-neighbor, or a woman on the other side of the world.
I fell for my husband the day he took a homeless man to lunch. Before then, my future mate had been a smart, funny, slightly older guy in the CBC newsroom where we both worked. But when I learned about his kindness to someone in need, David became "the one."
Without money, it would be nearly impossible for food banks to provide clients with a healthy dinner plate. That's because essentials like pasta, soup and beans pour in, while equally important items like fresh produce, meat and dairy items are in shorter supply. Financial donations create flexibility.
What is also clear is that the arrival of these refugee families is not the end of the process, but merely the end of the beginning. With the kindness and compassion present in so many Ontario communities large and small, it is clear that these new Syrian families will receive a warm welcome and be supported as they make a new start in this vast and diverse country.
I've heard it said that "it's better to give than receive," and I've always joked that that couldn't possibly be true. Yes, I give. I give generously, but I have never experienced such an incredible joy from making someone feel special for a few hours.
When you're loving and giving, the people on the receiving end of your kindness and generosity are touched by your warmth and it often moves them and inspires them to be more loving and giving to those around them, as well.