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Genetic Testing

Certainly women are driven to ask about genetic testing given a strong fear of breast cancer and a strong belief that early testing saves lives, but USPSTF feared many of the new customers lining up for the test would be classified as the "worried well" who would be unlikely to carry the rare genetic mutation and hence would receive no benefit from being screened.
Ontario is proposing a change to the Ontario Human Rights Code aimed at protecting people's genetic information from being used by insurance companies and employers. The proposed privacy regulations sound like a positive move for society -- a policy slam dunk. But, one can expect the insurance industry to oppose such legislation with some fairly logical and fundamental arguments.
I applaud Angelina Jolie for her bravery and willingness to share her experience with the public. When I was diagnosed with breast cancer, six years ago, I was not aware of the extent of my family's history with the disease. I know how it feels to be there. And even if you're a movie star, those decisions remain the same.
Being a cancer survivor for over five years now has significantly changed my perspective on life. I don't get stressed as much with situations, even serious ones such as this one, that are out of my control. The former me would probably have crawled under a rock with a blanket by now, a pair of earplugs firmly ensconced in her ears, and a thumb in her mouth.
I am willing to bet that researchers will never find an all-powerful "fat gene" (or genes) that we can blame for our weight-gain troubles. There will never be a gene therapy that will allow us to eat what we want. Genetic testing is not the answer.