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glass ceiling

A study on migrants in leadership positions has found they are few and far between.
In professions where women are quickly becoming the majority, such as medicine, dentistry and pharmacy, only rarely do they occupy leadership positions.
"A woman should walk three steps behind a man." For generations, this saying has shaped the mindset and image that women should be protected and men should take the lead. Sadly, this attitude is still common in Japanese society and it holds girls and women back.
International Women's Day provides us with an opportunity to reflect on the achievements and contributions of women and how they continue to shape the future of women in leadership. There are two key areas that stand out in my mind that are crucial to moving the needle for women in leadership in the future.
When it comes to women in tech, we know there needs to be a shift in attitude. Especially for females first entering and aiming to follow a progressive career path. While many emerging into the industry from technology programs worldwide, once in their field, there is still little advancement into upper management positions.
2133 is when the World Economic Forum is predicting global gender parity. And it's back to the future on wages. Only now in 2016 are women earning the amount men did in 2006. Despite the gloomy prediction and statistic, I believe the gender gap can and will be closed within my lifetime.
When making predictions about economic success, it is impossible to know what the future holds. Yet the corporate investment in women certainly isn't a hedge. Beyond simply a moral obligation towards equal opportunity, there is fiscal value in utilizing a previously undervalued resource.
Back in the 1970s, there were few positive female role models as business leaders. We live in an information age, we need leaders who are great communicators, understand the need for team work, and can bring a nurturing spirit to the workplace. Women are naturally effective in these areas. Although women have not yet achieved quite the salary equity of men, nor rule the majority of Fortune 500 companies, this is all changing as women step into their natural leadership capacities. Good leadership does not require a particular gender, but an individual who has developed good character, integrity and wisdom.
Even though not every risk delivers the results we desire, one thing is certain: the biggest risk for a woman is to hold back and try to be one of the crowd. If we hide what makes us special and unique, our companies will suffer and so will our careers. It is a lost opportunity.
Mismatched expectations about family demands is just as important as institutionalized sexism in the workplace when it comes