good health

We all have at least a vague idea of how our lives should look like. Most goals we set for ourselves are short- or mid-term. A long-range game plan or grand design is much harder to follow. But that doesn't mean we shouldn't take a closer look at what's in the cards for us from time to time.
Being able to extend life, of course, is a great success. But simply adding years of sickness, frailty and decline is not a very appealing prospect. Unfortunately, the progress we are making in terms of keeping people around longer is not always matched by advances in personal health and fitness -- both physically and mentally.
Traditional psychology has almost always been concerned with mental and emotional disorders and malfunctions and ways to treat them, he explains. By contrast, positive psychology adds an important emphasis on the human potential for building and maintaining highly functional and constructive lives.
Most Canadians have taken steps to prepare for their retirement, but ironically, the vast majority of Canadians have not spent much time or effort investing in the most important asset that will help them live comfortably through their golden years...their health.
Even the busiest of the multiple ball balancers find a way to move. Ride your bike to work, walk during your lunch hour or sit on a stability ball at your desk. Anything is better than nothing. You are designed to move. It will increase mental clarity, stimulate your immune system and make you a friendlier person.
One of the main reasons why, for instance, weight loss efforts fail to such a high degree is that dieters routinely start out with unrealistic expectations. They look at what's being presented to them by commercial weight loss programs or popular television shows and anticipate similarly spectacular outcomes in their own lives.
TORONTO - 'Tis the season for resolutions. And many of us are already busy pledging that come Jan. 1 we will do more of some