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government funding

Administrative barriers make it virtually impossible to gain funding, operate and create a sustainable business model in a timely fashion.
What do you know about First Nations policing in Ontario? Probably very little. First Nations policing has been seriously neglected for years despite several government-led initiatives aimed at providing the support necessary for these services to deliver quality and effective policing to the communities they serve.
I speculate that Toronto Fashion Week was unable to secure a key sponsor, which significantly impacted its operating budget. It is a shame that it was unable to secure a new sponsor. Perhaps an alternative sponsor opportunity may come to fruition. Unfortunately, there is another type of funding that is not available.
If someone gave you $80.5 million dollars, you'd probably feel pretty good about them. You may want to shout it from the rooftops that you think they're great -- and you may even be willing to pay a million dollars or two to shout it, especially if it meant the money would keep rolling in. In essence, that's what auditor general Bonnie Lysyk found was happening in Ontario with the Wynne government's secret payments to teachers' unions. The total amounts paid by the government to teachers union organizations is astounding: since 2000, $80.5 million in taxpayer money has been funneled to teachers' organizations.
As the BBC approaches its 100th anniversary, the venerable broadcaster is in a pitched battle for its future. The Canadian experience provides a lesson on how not to fund the BBC. Canada abandoned the licence fee in the 1950s on the premise that TV was too expensive to be funded by individual households.
Others have already debated some assumptions in the Truth and Reconciliation Committee report -- healthy, given that history should never be left to past or present politics. I will deal with popular beliefs about funding for First Nations people in Canada -- something I have some familiarity with having traced such numbers back to the mid-20th century.
This past week, I learned that a residential treatment program for youth (aka group home) in Welland, Ontario will be shutting its doors permanently at the end of November. Outside of my personal history growing up in group homes, this signals a much wider (and troublesome) trend in the world of child and youth workers.
When times get tough, history shows that dedicated funds can be quickly undedicated. California's only the latest example in a long history of governmental abuse of dedicated funds. This is one area where Al Gore may have had things right: Sometimes, you really do wish for a lock box.
Losing weight just became government business. The Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario yesterday announced