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Government of Ontario

Officials say the double-counting error has been corrected.
The PM previously said he won’t be “looking for wedge issues” in the upcoming election.
As the job market continues to contort and contract through the shifting of jobs, wages, and stability -- there is a growing voice, a growing question -- how do we make sure people across this province have the means to eat, to live, to thrive? How can we ensure that Ontarians are able to meet their most basic needs?
It seems, based on Ontario Environment and Climate Change Minister Glen Murray's actions, that the task of saving Ontario's honey bees is now an exercise in throwing out ideas without any concern for the impact it will have on saving the bees, or the broader consequences. Here's one he has not considered: ban cellphone use.
This past holiday season, food banks all across Ontario benefited from the generosity of their communities. Ontarians came together to donate food and financial support, both of which will make an enormous difference in the lives of people who struggle to make ends meet. Yet as the holiday lights and warmth fade and we head back into everyday life, we must not forget that this is not enough. In Ontario alone, it is estimated that 770,000 people visit food banks annually, and 20 per cent of food banks run out of supplies at least once every year. In a province that has more than enough food for everyone, why is this happening?
It is laughable that the Ontario Liberals are scolding residents of the province for not putting enough away for their own retirements when the Government has so chronically underfunded it's own defined benefit pension plans that they look more like Ponzi schemes than retirement benefits.
WHO research has found that unpaid volunteers provide the safest blood donations. Among donors, this group consistently has the lowest prevalence of blood borne infections. Secondly, reliance on unpaid donations also plays a critical role in maintaining the supply of blood products. When a country permits paid blood donations, the number of voluntary donors actually decreases.
In Canada and Ontario we currently face many labour market challenges, including the rise of precarious work, growing numbers of migrant workers, cuts to employment insurance and cuts to job training programs for vulnerable workers. We hope the new Premier will situate Ontario as a leader among the provinces and territories and will address these challenges head-on.
Elevator workers are a silent army that keeps our province moving by ensuring that the 50,000 elevators in workplaces, apartments, hotels, hospitals and schools are running smoothly and safely. On May 1, 1,400 elevator maintenance workers were forced on strike by their employer, the National Elevator Escalator Association (NEEA). While these workers are off the job there is a significant safety concern for the public.
It is unthinkable anyone would lose their life over $112 bucks of gasoline. The dragging death of gas station attendant Jayesh Prajapati after he was run over by a driver fleeing the station without paying is another tragic reminder of how senseless and avoidable some crimes are. We may only hear about the fatal incidents of gas theft, but according to the Toronto Star, between July 2009 and 2010 there were 1,618 reports of gas thefts in Toronto. That is more than 30 opportunities a week similar incidents could occur. Liberal MPP Mike Colle rightly sensed there is an opportunity to update Ontario's laws to require motorists to pre-pay for gas they pump.