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Governor General David Johnston

He made the comment on a CBC radio show.
Let's all think about why and how Canadians can be encouraged to give their time, talent or treasure for the common good, and then find ways to put our ideas into action. And let's challenge ourselves to become an even more caring nation.
Why do I share this story on National Aboriginal Day? Because the Salluit Running Club is an example of something we don't hear enough of in southern Canada: a good news story from the North. And while it cannot and must not be forgotten that Salluit, like many northern communities, faces significant challenges--including, most tragically, an alarmingly high number of youth suicides--I encountered many reasons for hope during my visit to communities in northern Manitoba, Nunavut and Nunavik.
If Canada is to remain a leader in innovation, more must be done to focus our efforts on building up the resource that is responsible for innovation -- talent. There already exists a global race to acquire the best and brightest talent to drive innovation and create the products and services that change the way we live, work and play.
He's in Washington to talk about innovation.
The chartered plane from Beirut carried about 214 refugees.
"Now is not the time to raise taxes."
Just as Trudeau did when he invited the public to the swearing-in of his cabinet ministers at Rideau Hall, or by meeting with the provincial and territorial ministers for the first time since 2009, or by attending the UN climate change summit with his provincial counterparts and opposition leaders, Trudeau is signalling that his is a different government. Gone is Stephen Harper's uncaring, exclusionary and secretive government. Instead, the Liberals are saying, they will be open, transparent, collaborative and caring. Time will tell whether they hold true to those promises.
The leaders were quick to point out what Liberals left out of their throne speech.
The throne speech mentioned a "nation-to-nation" relationship with the country's First Nations, Metis and Inuit.