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Green Energy Act

The McGuinty version of fiscal austerity includes green-jobs boondoggles. Ontarians must overpay twice for energy: once in the form of huge overpayments to uncompetitive solar and wind producers, and then again in the form of subsidies to companies that manufacture the components for solar and wind.
Dalton McGuinty's Green Energy Act has failed to provide the thousands of high value jobs he has spent the last two years claiming it would and Canada's reputation as a free trader is being challenged by important members of the global community. But sadly, it's Ontarians who will clean up the mess.
If McGuinty's support of democracy and compelling arguments is legitimate, a moratorium, proper independent health study on impacts from wind turbines and restoration of planning control should be forthcoming for rural municipalities.
The Green Energy Act is an issue that has been festering in rural Ontario communities for years. The Liberals are campaigning in defence of their Green Energy Act, while the opposition has centred around three key issues: health and environmental impacts, process issues around decision making and the economics of the feed-in-tariff program.
The challenge with tracking the green economy stems from the fact that this sector is, well, not a sector. There are no occupational classifications dedicated to green jobs, and no industry codes either. How can we tell whether or to what extent the green economy has been successful?
Why are we shouting at Dalton McGuinty for our hydro bills being slightly higher when his overall objective is to create valuable jobs here in Ontario? All the while, this policy is reducing our share of the planet's destruction. People need to be better educated as to what, exactly, as it stake here.
Countries that have embraced a green economy have been among the most successful in recent years, weathering the economic downturn and attracting investment and jobs. This is not an opportunity that we can afford to miss.
Canadian politicians know well enough to avoid hot buttons like religion or tax hikes. So why then is Ontario Progressive