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gut bacteria

A new study suggests a possible solution to the diarrhea and stomach infections that can accompany a regimen of antibiotics.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Over the last few weeks, researchers have discovered a natural yet nasty phenomenon leading to troubles in the elderly. The reports focus on two very different parts of our bodies, the immune system and the microbial population in our guts. Though both studies were conducted in mice, the results unveil an inconvenient reality we may all face as we get older.
Earlier this month, an international team of researchers discovered even more benefits to fibre. Based on their findings, eating the indigestible may help our bodies stay balanced. Even more interesting, these improvements may occur without the help of our gut bacteria.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg For years, researchers have been examining how microbes help us stay healthy through exercise. Over this time, several mechanisms have been identified and shared across the scientific literature spectrum. While beneficial to scientists, this scattered route has not been particularly helpful to most Canadians.
The digestive tract truly is the cornerstone to our health. The large surface area provides a barrier to a contained environment that manages exposures to food, chemicals, and infection. To mange these complex exposures, the gut is well equipped. The gut houses trillions of bacteria that make up our microbiome (referred to as the second genome) and help our bodies in the process of digestion, absorption and metabolism.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg Over the last decade, researchers have gained insight into how certain gut microbes, particularly bacteria, influence our health. They have learned the mere presence of some species can affect us. Yet the majority of effects on wellness come as a result of the byproducts these organisms make.
Feeling gassy and bloated is NOT normal.
2012-05-28-GermGuyBanner.jpg If you were to take a microscope to your intestines, you would see tens of trillions of microbes moving around doing what they do best: eating and multiplying. Yet, while this may appear to be a utopic environment, what's happening is exactly the opposite. There's a microbial war happening and your health depends on which side wins.
the focus of this blog is how glyphosate may damage our metabolisms, causing many of us to gain weight. In essence, it is said to destroy the "beneficial" bacteria in our intestines, which is the kind of bacteria that helps us properly digest food and burn calories more efficiently.
I was first introduced to sorghum during my undergrad at the University of Guelph when we were studying celiac disease; then it popped back into my pantry three years ago. Sorghum is a gluten-free whole grain that has shown prebiotic potential.