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habitat for humanity

According to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, 12.5 per cent of all Canadian households experience an affordability crisis every day. Let me be clear -- this crisis is not limited to the real estate markets in Toronto and Vancouver. It is endemic and disproportionally affects low income working families, seniors, Indigenous people and recent immigrants. This is a large segment of our population that continually struggles to pay for the necessities of life.
Five years after the devastating earthquake that rocked the lives and homes of thousands of Haitian men, women and children, the shadow of that tragic day remains. Thanks to the overwhelmingly generosity of Canadian individuals and support from organizations and government, progress in Port-au-Prince and surrounding areas has been made.
A home of your own is far more than a financial asset. For low-income families, ownership of a safe and decent home can play a vital role in a family's health and happiness, to the point where fewer sick days are taken and kids are getting better grades in school.
Homeownership rates have declined among Canada's lowest-income group. For that reason, today, on National Housing Day, I strongly encourage you to consider donating your next dollar, or volunteering your next hour, to help a family move closer to homeownership. It's to everyone's benefit.
When the story of Attawapiskat’s housing emergency hit the headlines, non-Aboriginal Canadians got a glimpse into a crisis
Sukkahville is a celebration of design as well as an observation of a religious holiday and harvest festival. A sukkah is the name of a temporary shelter constructed by observant Jews at this time of year. Part design competition, part fundraiser, the multi-faceted celebration will culminate in a Pop-up exhibit to which everyone is invited on Sunday September 30
A common misconception about Habitat is that our homes are a handout, but what we actually provide is affordable homeownership, with low-income partner families repaying the full market value of their home over time. Last year, the lives of 227 families struggling to break the cycle of poverty began to be transformed as they moved into Habitat homes built in communities across Canada. Homeownership can change lives.
In Toronto, many thousands live in substandard housing, including 20,000 members of the Jewish community. As a local non-profit housing provider, Kehilla Residential Programme is acutely aware of the situation and has been striving to chip away at it since the organization's founding in 1982. Sukkahville 2012 is an innovative event organized by Kehilla, aimed at highlighting and combating the housing issues faced by so many members of the Toronto community.
Stewart Hardacre, like many young adventurers, wanted to bask in the glory of travel, and extended his trip to Machu Picchu
Before Lindsay Metzger's mother qualified for the family's Habitat house, that was not the path her life was on. The family of four moved around a lot, from rental to rental, most of them not very nice. Habitat doesn't just build houses. It builds better futures for the people who live in them.