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hackers

Your phone can serve as a “gateway" when plugged into a public USB port.
There are ways to protect your privacy so you don't become a victim.
Is it safe to go online after two major ransomware attacks in as many months? I would bet many would say, 'you've got to
Criminals take the path of least resistance. The weakest link is the employee. Data breaches are mostly the result of employee error or an inside job, according to the ACC Foundation: State of Cybersecurity Report. The best way for organizations to protect themselves is to create and foster a culture of cyber security awareness.
The popular myth for a non-profit organization executive is to ask, "Why anyone would want to hack us?" The nefarious nature makes non-profits easy targets because they often invest less in employee training and IT security.
Log management systems are largely based on one concern; finding the root cause of a problem, like security breaching, diagnosing issues, chasing down server errors and looking up customer activity. There is now a market for the logging management industry, whereas there's nothing new about all softwares and systems producing log files.
A Canadian SIN card was seen being sold out of China for $173.
It is generally assumed that aversion to risk is one of the biggest obstacles to Canadian innovation, but only 10 per cent of Canadian businesses are truly risk averse. The big issue is apparently an inability to align risk-taking with financial capacity -- rational risk-taking obviously involves being able to survive the potential negative consequences of your actions. And that's a key lesson buried in the aftermath of the hacker attack on the controversial Ashley Madison online affair service.
Let's be clear -- no one who signed up for Ashley Madison has committed a crime or participated in illegal activity. Shouldn't we be channelling our outrage towards a group of hackers for taking it upon themselves to determine what's immoral and what's appropriate conduct on the Internet? Using cyber-terrorism as a tool to shame people who may not navigate by the same moral compass as you is not only the ultimate breach in privacy; it's an attack on net neutrality. Imposing fear on people for how they behave online is just as repressive as restricting certain behaviours and content in the first place.
What are best practices individuals can employ to lessen the chance of hacking of their computer or device? Here is a quick "top 20 list," based on part of an education session I have been providing to directors of company boards on cyber security.