HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

hip-hop

Canadian rapper Cadence Weapon talks about his journey to self-discovery, his new album and how being mindful has impacted his music.
When a Black emcee says the N-word, it's about identity and survival.
It's easy to fall in love with Kardinal Offishall ("Kardi"). He's enigmatic, enthusiastic and has smile that can light up
SPONSORED FEATURE
When Drake strutted into the ACC arena on August 1, dressed all in black with an OVO shirt and a beard, he wasn't just the biggest star onstage or even the biggest rapper in hip hop. Drake can legitimately claim to be the biggest star in music and so he invited the only others operating at his level this year.
As someone who's been a working journalist and video content creator for more than a decade, I want to take my storytelling to the next level, particularly when it comes to telling the stories of black women. I want to be someone who helps change the narrative. The 20th anniversary of the American Black Film Festival (ABFF) seemed like the right place to cultivate creative inspiration.
Rihanna was once the world's preeminent pop star. And yes, I use past tense. Despite having her hit "Work" firmly ensconced at number one for the past two months, a stat that ties her with the Beatles as second only to Mariah Carey for most weeks atop the Billboard Hot 100 chart, Rihanna has recently transcended pop stardom.
They were using their talents and resources to pursue their passions. We often celebrate young people (think Bill Gates for instance) for doing this in other businesses and personal pursuits, but it takes on a very different tone when young black men from stigmatized areas take an unconventional path and invest their energies into it.
Lamar blew audiences away with a politically-charged performance about race and police brutality.
Growing up in the hip-hop culture, I've battled with loving the music and hating some of the speech at the same time. Hip-hop heads who find themselves staring down the barrel of this conundrum, typically choose to embrace hip-hop while being extremely cognizant of its problematic nature. We're forced to view the music by its totality, and that's the mature way to not only view N.W.A. and Dr. Dre, but most human beings.