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homes

So, you've decided to buy a new house. Congrats! But the truth is that doing it all on your own is tough. The good news is
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5 tips to get the mortgage that's right for you. From the AOL Partner Studio
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By Wayne Karl Bryan Tuckey was on fire. Speaking at the Toronto Real Estate Board's (TREB) recent Market Year in Review & Outlook
Now that Donald Trump has been sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, should we prepare for an onslaught of Americans moving north and buying Canadian homes? Don't bank on it. Americans cannot just pick up and move here because they don't like their new president.
From foreign buyers gobbling up properties sight unseen to young families trying to raise kids in condo towers, the Canadian housing market is a hot topic of discussion these days. But what do houses really cost these days?
If Alberta invested $34 per capita, the average of other provinces, Alberta would generate $510 million in energy savings and 3,000 jobs while reducing emissions and making Alberta more competitive.
A carbon neutral home and net-zero home are similar in that both produce as much energy as they consume over the course of a year. The difference is a net-zero home produces its own energy right on the home, whereas a carbon neutral home can produce its energy elsewhere in the community.
An earthship is an off-grid home that produces its own energy, captures its own water, treats its own wastewater, grows its own food and passively collects the sun's energy for heat. That's the idea, anyways. But ever since the Kinney Earthship was built in the summer of 2014, Duncan Kinney has received many emails about one particular subject: how does it hold up so far north?
BuzzBuzzHome: Nothing says ‘living the high life’ like living in your building’s highest home. Photo: imgur We don’t know
A net-zero home reimagines the house not as a burden on the planet but as a regenerative node. Net-zero homes only started being seriously considered about a decade ago, but once proven, the idea took off.