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What was once something to start thinking about is now impossible to ignore for companies looking to attract the country's top talent. Our new reality is that, in today's market, businesses need to recognize and adapt to the changing demands of workers if they want to get the staff they want and keep employees loyal and motivated.
It is OK to leave bad jobs and toxic managers. And it is actually important to let employers know this is why you are leaving. Bad managers cost companies money, resources, time, and talent. And there is no need to be afraid of them or their impact on our future success. They need to be called out.
While "equal pay for work of equal value" is enshrined in law under Ontario's Pay Equity Act, the gender wage gap is a serious issue. Statistics Canada data estimates the gap to be anywhere between 12 to 31.5 per cent and RBC estimates it is costing the Canadian economy $168 billion in lost income.
The HR sector, employment and recruiting world are constantly evolving. And so are the terms that define the industry. You have probably already noticed, we no longer speak only of recruiting but also of staffing and talent acquisition.
Ultimately, you want your people moving up the leadership ladder, going from being told what to do, to providing opinions and recommendations, to advising what they intend to do and what they have done. The more comfortable your people are in making decisions on their own, the more control the leader is giving up.
When looking for a new job, timing can be everything. February has more job openings becoming available and fewer applications for them than January. From now through the spring could be the right time to make your move.
As technology, culture and social norms are all changing rapidly, employers need talent that can combine technical know-how with general capabilities, or soft skills. As such, hiring managers are now looking for more than IQ and EQ in prospective employees.
The disconnect is clear. Canada's economy needs both genders at the wheel, but men are currently still doing the majority of the driving. What can businesses do to improve? The good news is that there are a number of solutions, but they need to be taken seriously.
I meet with HR as often as I eat breakfast and they have some movie-making stories to reveal about the candidates they meet. So I sat down with Tara De Jonge of 2020 Inc.in Montreal, to get the story straight from the horse's mouth because I know, as much as I say it, it's not the same coming from her!
More than half of Canadians don't mind handling work-related matters on their own time. More than half. A new Workmonitor survey from Randstad Canada revealed some troubling insights about Canadian workers' lack of ability -- or lack of willingness -- to leave their work at the office.