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Hugo Chavez

After enduring government-mandated power blackouts, shortages of medicine, standing in line for food, and rampant crime, Venezuelans were standing in line last week for a different reason: to validate their signatures in an attempt to force a referendum to recall President Nicolás Maduro.
Attracted to these networks of hate are certain academics who openly defend Venezuela's authoritarian regime with weak arguments that do not withstand a minimal confrontation with the facts. These academics are blind and deaf before evidence, even when it is irrefutable and speaks for itself.
All of the destabilization tactics are designed to convey the impression that the government is incompetent, and that it needs to be changed. Ultimately, though, widespread support is needed, and in this respect, the opposition -- though well-funded by the U.S. -- has so far failed.
It didn't take long for Harper to express his opinions about Chavez's government after his death. On the very same day that
This is the sound of anti-semitism. It knows no boundaries. The sound travels through time, crosses generations, gender, religion
Media around the world have devoted a great deal of coverage to the death of Hugo Chavez, who passed away last Tuesday after losing his fight against cancer. His legacy as the President of the "Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela" needs to be seen in the light of a long tradition of populism in Latin American history.
Rumors, secrecy and the hermeticism lasted until the last day before the death of Venezuelan president Hugo Chavez. The government handled the illness of Chavez with emotionally charged messages, religious references and few medical details.
Hugo Chavez, a fiery populist who declared a socialist revolution in his native country and crusaded against the USA's imperial influence, passed away on March 5. During more than 14 years in office, Chávez routinely challenged the status quo at home and internationally. Some enlightened observers might wonder why the man the media vilifies is showered with love and adulation despite his perceived transgressions. While I cannot speak for the Venezuelan people, I have some theories as to why Hugo Chávez means so much to millions of world citizens.
OTTAWA - Venezuela has sent a formal protest to the Canadian government for Prime Minister Stephen Harper's "insensitive
New leadership in Venezuela after the death of Hugo Chavez could have a positive impact on the oil and gas sector in Calgary