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hygiene

In certain circumstances, the bacteria that make a home in and on our bodies can become some of our most feared pathogens.
One of the unfortunate but inevitable effects of aging -- for both men and women -- is that personal care like grooming and makeup seems to require longer and greater efforts. But it remains as important as ever, and so does getting properly and tastefully dressed.
Safe drinking water and decent toilets should be basic essentials in every school, everywhere. Unfortunately, it's not the case for millions of children in the world. Take the 500 students at St. John Bosco Gayaza Primary School in Uganda for example. The water source they rely on is an open pool located about one kilometre from their school.
Instead of drugs, some researchers found they could use microbes -- in this case, worms. Officially known as helminths, these microscopic wrigglers could be used to treat certain allergies. When researchers took a closer look at how these supposed pathogens were actually helping people, they found a surprising result.
There is one critical issue that has been omitted from the SDGs -- the issue of addressing menstrual health and hygiene. Menstruation affects half of the global population. It is a topic that all women and girls are intimately familiar with and yet it is so rarely talked about on the global stage.
Last week, an international team of researchers revealed how bacteria in the oral cavity may be able to withstand even the hardest toothbrushing. Their research showed just how stable certain species can be and suggested the cure may require a more ecological approach.
If you ever suspect that your doctor, nurse or other health-care provider forgot to use the hand sanitizer, by all means raise the question. But, in reality, most patients in your situation are reluctant to do so. Surveys going back almost a decade found that Ontario patients didn't want to be placed in the role of a police officer to ensure that doctors and nurses wash their hands.
It's that time of year again: flu season. Once again, the influenza virus has showed up in Canada threatening up to 20 per cent of the population. For the vaccine to be effective, it has to perfectly mimic the viruses in nature. This is actually harder than one might think as influenza is the master of evolutionary disguise.
These children practiced their performance to express their gratitude to CARE and above all to show us that even in their desperate situation, they have dignity and hope for the future. Handwashing may seem like such a simple act, but for the kids in South Sudan, it can help raise the possibility of many more birthdays to come.