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immigrant

Have you ever tried to have an important conversation with someone but felt like they just didn't understand you? Then you
I am proud to live in a country that celebrates diversity and inclusion. Talented immigrants arrive every year to call Canada home, and these newcomers shape this country's future in important ways. Earlier this year, I wrote about the value of honouring the immigrants that help make Canada better. It was a broad call to acknowledge the social, economic and cultural contribution that thousands of immigrants make to our country.
Getting a business off the ground takes many long hours and hard work -- but as any entrepreneur knows, it doesn't end there. Small business owners assume many roles -- from manager of sales and marketing to finance, HR and more. The challenge can be finding time to manage these day-to-day operations and grow the business.
Boyi's is just one tale among many immigrants who each have a unique story that helps define Canada. Their successes help build a country that is rich in diversity and a home where newcomers thrive. And as someone who has thrived by inspiring others, Boyi believes his meaning in life is "worth what I am for others, for the community."
As mayor, I am often asked what the key ingredients are that make Markham one of the most vibrant and successful municipalities in Canada. The answer is simple. Diversity is Markham's strength. Professionals, business executives, retail operators and skilled trades persons come to our city from all over the world.
My children and I were strangers, and you welcomed us. I will forever be grateful to you all. And as we see thousands of Canadians doing what you, my sponsors, did for my family, I can only be grateful to all of them as well, and tell the new Syrian refugees that they are in good hands.
At 21 years old, I realize that I have done myself a disservice. I can barely form a coherent sentence in my language, letters are foreign squiggles to me, and I find myself performing exaggerated gestures to communicate with my non-English speaking grandma. This is certainly not due to a lack of exposure to Tamil, but more as a result of a conscious distancing.
I knew him for a while. He landed in Canada 28 years back without a penny. He got a job in the kitchen of a restaurant immediately
Girls like me are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Our critiques about, let's say, the misogyny within our community are so often co-opted by white Eurocentric feminism as a kind of "see, look, the oppressed brown women need us!" And at the same time, I don't want to silence myself from critiquing by own community just because I'm scared that some white feminists may twist my words.
My parents raised me with an Italian paintbrush against a stark blank Canadian canvas which we discovered together slowly and willingly as a family, and on my own life's journey through school, work, marriage and raising a family.