imperial metals

Three years ago, Mount Polley mine dumped 26 billion liters of waste into Hazelton Creek, Polley Lake and Quesnel Lake.
It is still unknown what the long-term effects will be, and numerous local families and businesses have suffered great losses and hardship. Many of us doubt we can be made whole again -- by the mine or the province.
Make no mistake, there's a price to pay when B.C. Hydro becomes a political arm of government. The intertwining of self-interests gets complicated, while the interests of ratepayers can take a backseat to political interests.
An ugly thread of misspent taxpayer dollars, environmental destruction and conflict-of-interest -- backed by a government beholden to the mining industry -- runs along the recently completed Northwest Transmission Line, charges acclaimed explorer and scholar Wade Davis.
Commercial and sports fishing fill the freezers and wallets of Wrangell residents but, out of mind for many of them, behind the shield of the Coast Mountains, lurks a threat that could annihilate the area's fishing and tourism-based economy.
"It's not just what the breach did environmentally to us; it's what has happened with the bad publicity we got when this went around the world. That also hurt everybody here."
Long-held perceptions of Canada as a country with strict environmental standards and B.C. as a province that values natural beauty are taking a near-fatal beating in Southeast Alaska, where many now regard Canadians as bad neighbours who are unilaterally making decisions that could threaten the region's two major economic drivers.
Twenty years ago when someone said "Clayoquot," protests against clearcutting of old growth forests came to mind. At that time nobody thought anybody was crazy enough to propose an open-pit copper mine in the heart of Clayoquot Sound.
The B.C. mine is trying to reopen after a dam collapsed last summer, spilling waste into waterways.
The 2014 financial reports from B.C.'s political parties are out and my face hurts from all of the eyebrow raising.