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integrity

Not being true to your authentic self can result in anxiety, depression, frustration, addiction, and a lack of meaning and fulfillment in your life.
We shouldn't encourage that thinking. We need to create a revolution of people who reward others for "doing the right thing". We need Canadian companies to be ethical, to be honest, and to want to do the right thing, because it is the right thing to do.
I was quite taken aback by Justin Trudeau's performance at the Globe and Mail debate. We have all seen how Stephen Harper's Conservatives fail to tell the truth and mislead the public, so it's hard to believe that anyone could do worse. My issue with Trudeau has nothing to do with his performance or speaking skill. It has everything to do with the substance and content of his speech, and this speaks to his integrity.
In all of my interviews with directors over the years, when I ask about a director's greatest regret the answer is consistently, "I should have spoken up when I had the chance." Chances are several of your colleagues are thinking the exact same thing.
One of the most important ethical decisions most of us make is who to work for. You may think that your choice of employer will not affect your ethics, but this is unrealistic. When you work for a company that engages in unethical conduct, it is hard to survive without participating in or at least condoning that conduct.
Western industry will mistakenly argue that integrity laws will disadvantage them or cost their industry jobs, but the reality is the opposite. Tough integrity laws will prevent substandard competitors from offering bribes, will disincentivize recipients from receiving bribes, and will strengthen Western companies who compete on the basis of price, quality and service.
As a girl, a wise woman told me my eyes would elicit people's secrets throughout my life. I took her words to heart. From that day forward, I resolved to be a gatekeeper not a gossiper, and in some mystical way, like a magnetic field, her prophecy came true.
Every year, political corruption kills as many as 140,000 children worldwide, by depriving them of medical care, food, and water. Yet, far too often, the perpetrators of the most outrageous acts of corruption are able to use their illicit wealth and power to pervert the very laws and institutions that should call them to account.
We have created a political system bent on sound bites and quick hitting verbal assaults. We like the one-liner and a good zinger. But as leaders, this is not realistic. We need people to stand up for integrity. Without it, there is no trust, and without trust there is no real communication.
Trust at the board level is necessary at three intersection points: board and CEO, board member to board member, and CEO to C-suite. Why does trust matter? Think about the transactional costs of a low-trust relationship. In low trust relationships, suspicion abounds and parties feel compelled to paper every decision and every discussion. What can boards and executives do about this? Here is some advice.