Intellectual Property

The U.S. Trade Representative is still keeping the country on a lower-level watchlist for piracy concerns.
If you torrent all your movies, this one's for you.
The pact that Canada is being urged to join looks a lot like the "bad deal" Trudeau vowed to reject.
It's happened an enormous amount recently and it grinds my gears. You may be asking, but isn't imitation the highest form of flattery? No, it's not. It's irritating as all hell.
A review of the list of consultations on the government's website and tweets by minister Freeland show a number of meetings with these particular TPP critics. All of this raises the question of whether the minister is hearing the alternative positive case for the TPP.
The prospect of considering expanded blocking for copyright purposes validates the fears of civil liberties groups that the introduction of blocking requirements invariably expands to cover a wider net of content. Canadian copyright was already on track for a boisterous debate in the coming years with changes such as copyright term extension mandated by the Trans Pacific Partnership and a review of the law scheduled for 2017. If government officials envision adding VPN usage, access to U.S. Netflix and website blocking to the list of issues, copyright could emerge as one of the government's most difficult and controversial issues.
The new Liberal government has yet to say whether it will support TPP in its current form.
Beyond the war of statistics, the principles of liberty and personal responsibility must be brought back to the heart of discussions about tobacco consumption, or consumption of any other product deemed "harmful" to one's health. You don't need to be a radical libertarian to start to ask some serious questions regarding the tendency of certain groups to want to regiment all aspects of people's lives under the pretext of protecting their health.
The Harper government has introduced an extension of copyright terms as part of the federal budget, in a move that is likely
Tech giants like Google, Facebook, Uber and Airbnb have entered unchartered policy territory where ethics debates, grey areas and government relations are the daily norm. While the seeming nuisance of having to deal with all these new policy implications all at once may seem cumbersome, the economic benefits and progress that has been made far outweigh the work.