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intergenerational

Grandmothers across the globe play a far more important role than the go-to babysitter on date night. As it turns out, we've learned that grandmothers are vital to not only caring for young children but also advising and educating younger women in their communities on all aspects of family well-being.
With Valentine's Day just around the corner, Canadians are preparing to be inundated with feel-good stories of love and romance. From the excitement of puppy love to heartwarming tales of soulmates finding each other despite the odds, it seems that none of us are immune to the effects of Cupid's arrow. Despite all this, a common myth still pervades that love, romance and the need for companionship fade over time, and that as we grow older, we become less interested in keeping love alive.
We are currently at a historical crossroads where there's a shift in demographics in the workplace as people are living longer, active lifestyles. This also means that workplaces are made up of a rich mix of employees spanning generations both starting their careers and approaching retirement.
Intergenerational networking is when different age cohorts interact, providing participants with fresh ideas and inspiration to build their business and rejuvenate their careers. It can take place on an informal, conversational basis at work or in a social setting. It can also be a structured process within an organization where employees share ideas and insights into how to improve business and build trust internally.
Numerous articles, academic papers, and books have been written by people of all generations about the new complex social and organizational dynamic in the workplace as Millennials and Boomers vie for corner office or executive parking spaces.
The days of bonding with your grandparents while drinking tea and eating homemade cookies seem to be long gone. Grandmas