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interns

With all the negative attention around internships, companies may be tempted to shy away from the idea, but this is a poor business decision. The investment you make in internship programs can provide a tremendous return for the company and the student, so it should not be overlooked.
If you are hiring summer students, have teenagers slouching around the house, or you are a forward-thinking CEO, you are spending some time thinking about Gen Z. The follow-on generation to the Millennials is something of an unknown to most. The biggest question: how they are going to perform in the workforce?
This fairly clear ministry statement may explain why, when I and others questioned Greenpeace Canada via social media last week about the Greenpeace internship posting, the posting very quickly disappeared. Andrew Langille, a Toronto-based labour lawyer, pointed out on social media that he thought Greenpeace "is running numerous illegal unpaid internship scams. Employee misclassification at its finest."
The Ministry of Labour is paying more and more attention to the issue of unpaid internships. With this in mind, it becomes increasingly important for employers to understand the laws surrounding unpaid internships, and to know what steps they can take to ensure they remain protected under law. An unpaid intern may seem like a great idea, but there are a couple of key points to keep in mind if your organization is looking to take one on.
"While the Labour Code does not specifically address internships, it protects the rights of an employee to be paid for work
About 40 years ago, I lived in a co-op (cooperative student housing) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. My home