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interviews

You know the drill: You submitted your job application, complete with a cover letter and resume. You were selected for an interview. Then you headed to your potential-future-employer to shake some hands and answer every single interview question. But what if some of those questions seem a little ... off?
What does your handshake say about you? Does it proclaim to the world that you're confident and bold? Or does it mumble and look away, letting everyone know that you're shy and neurotic? The good news is, if you don't like what your handshake says about you, you can change the conversation.
We have been raised all of our lives with the world trying to suppress who we are and telling us who we ought to be to fit in. How bizarre is it that we try to change who we are, to try and fit, versus just being more of ourselves and finding the opportunity that actually fits us?
I'm shocked and amazed by how few people do informational interviews. Hell, a lot of people don't even know what they are. An informational huh? What is that? Well pull up a chair, sonny. You're about to get schooled. Here's what you need to know about informational interviews and how to score one for yourself.
It's not the actual interview questions that cause difficulties for candidates. It's understanding why the interviewer is asking them in the first place. What is it that they really want to know? The information that employers are after is often quite different from the literal answer to the question asked.
I've been binge listening to Sarah Koenig riveting podcast "Serial" and it's got my wheels turning about interview tactics. Sarah is a phenomenal interviewer. She has a subtle way of making everyone she speaks to feel like a buddy, like she's on your side, even when she's asking very tough questions. So how the hell does she do it?
Are bucket lists just a load of bullshit? Not exactly. Instead, Schultz recommends making travel plans that correspond with fulfilling a lifelong dream or exploring countries meaningfully. "It's worth going back to countries and finding what thrills you," she says. "Or to finally visit something you've longed to see since you were nine years old."
Any way you cut it, the process of hiring employees that are the best fit for your company can be arduous and stressful. And with so many people looking for employment, we can expect that identifying the right candidate for the job will only get more difficult. Here are a few strategies we've been using.
Trey Anthony is the creator and star of the ground-breaking production, 'da Kink in My Hair, which had its start on the stage and later debuted in 2007 on Global Television -- and has touched many women's lives. She is the first Black woman to write and produce a television show on a prime time network in Canada -- and her trailblazing ways have not stopped there.
Dreaming has taken us to the moon and Mars. It has given us automobiles, movies, books, the iPhone and Facebook. Humans can live longer, healthier lives thanks to dreaming. It is the spirit of the dream that propels us forward. I confess: I am a dreamer myself.