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invasive species

The invasive, toxic plant inconveniently looks like Queen Anne's lace - but giant.
Some scientists have declared that Lake Winnipeg is a lost cause, but there is both reason and evidence for hope.
Invasive species are the second most common threat associated with species extinctions.
Many of the plants we have in our yards are not native to Canada. In some cases, these non-native plants are invasive and can intrude into nearby natural areas or affect the growth and spread of native species. In most cases, native plants provide better habitat for birds and pollinators than non-native plants. Honey bees depend on native plants in order to produce honey and survive while doing their part to spread these native species.
These are beautiful plants, some flowering, further masking their sinister side effects. And they are an invasive species, meaning they are increasingly found in many parts of Canada. If you are gardening, hiking or cottaging this summer, it's advised you familiarize yourself with what these plants look like so you can steer clear.
So far, no case of Zika has been contracted in Canada. But some people wonder if that might change. At first blush, this question seemed silly, especially when asked in the middle of a cold Canadian winter. But winter is receding and some people in Hamilton who know what they are talking about are asking that very question. Could Zika come to Canada?
There's some promising news on the mountain pine beetle's presence, or lack thereof.
They have no natural predators in Alberta.
Lionfish may be one of the most truly beautiful creatures you'll encounter when you're scuba diving or snorkelling in tropical water. There's nothing wrong with lionfish where they're indigenous -- the Indian and Pacific Ocean. But about 20 years ago a few started to appear in the Caribbean.
Without question, the Asian carp poses a significant threat to the health of the Great Lakes watershed. This highlights the importance of effective invasive species prevention programs and bi-national collaboration to ensure that the Asian carp and other non-native species don't make their way into these waters.