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iran relations

The re-integration of Iran into the international community is a momentous opportunity for further consultation and engagement to resolve disagreements over its regional policies and to address concerns over Iran's human rights record.
One of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal MPs has joined forces with the Iranian Canadian Congress in pushing the government
The sister of Saeed Malekpour, a Canadian resident and engineer who is unlawfully imprisoned in Iran, is calling on Canadians to help push for her brother's release and safe return to Canada. Her efforts have so far moved Iran's leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei to quash Malekpour's death sentence.
As "Implementation Day" of the historic nuclear deal between world powers and Iran approaches, during which Iran will begin fulfilling the bulk of its end of the agreement while sanctions by the United Nations, United States and the European Union are removed, Canada must begin planning for the eventual restoration of ties with Iran in keeping with the new Trudeau government's affirmation to re-engage Tehran.
International relations with Iran suffered under Stephen Harper. There's a noteworthy Iranian-Canadian community scattered across Canada, which has nurtured prominent artists, scientists, scholars, business people, entrepreneurs, journalists and even politicians who maintain close relations with the fellow citizens living in Iran. Now, as the Liberal government of Justin Trudeau is soon to be inaugurated, Iranians living in Canada and their compatriots at home are wishing for a quick and immediate normalization of the relations between Tehran and Ottawa.
The International Human Rights Program (IHRP) at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law and David Asper Centre for Constitutional Rights were interveners before the Supreme Court and argued that the right to a remedy is protected under international law, and is a principle of fundamental justice under the Charter (which protects life, liberty and security of the person). The Supreme Court rejected that argument.
Taken overall, the Harper government's response to the Iranian deal is symptomatic of its wider foreign policy, which has abandoned any sense of realism. Instead of welcoming the accord as a major breakthrough and a potential chance to help stabilize the Middle East, Canada appears intent on mirroring Netanyahu's futile zero-sum, intensely hostile approach to Iran.
For nearly 34 years, the United States and Iran have declared each other sworn enemies. Last week's phone call between the two countries' presidents -- the first in almost 30 years -- represents a remarkable opportunity to end this hostility. The lines of communication need to stay open.
A group of prominent Iranian-Canadians had face time with Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Foreign Minister John Baird and
Iran's parliamentary speaker has cancelled a visit to Canada, after Ottawa announced it would shut its embassy in Tehran