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Jean Charest

"I will not be a candidate to succeed Mr. Harper. I am very happy with my new life and with my work at the McCarthy Tétrault
EDMONTON ‚ÄĒ Thomas Mulcair is looking to his and former Quebec premier Jean Charest‚Äôs past to plot out the NDP‚Äôs election
Former Quebec Premier Jean Charest says he wants to put an end to any speculation that he might return to political life
Jean Charest won't rule out returning to politics and running for the federal Conservatives someday. But, then again, the
Over five years ago, I proposed to then European Union (EU) Trade Commissioner Peter Mandelson, that Europe and Canada enter into negotiations for the creation of a broad economic partnership between Canada and the EU. This agreement could break new ground by providing provisions, even if modest, in terms of labour mobility.
Former Quebec Premier Jean Charest and an unlikely Republican politician-turned-environmentalist are among the people predicting
After the second protest in the last two weeks following a provincial summit on higher education, everything about Montreal's current spring weather seemed to have year-old Maple Spring undertones to it, including violence, arrests and injuries. The plight of student debt, post graduation underemployment, and rising housing costs are all unarguably quite legitimate burdens faced by my generation. Will free tuition as demanded by the Association pour une solidarit√© syndicale √©tudiante (ASS√Č) and its followers solve these zeitgeist conundrums? Unlikely.
The three candidates for Quebec's Liberal Party leadership took part in the second of five debates to determine who will
You wouldn't ever want to answer your front door to find Wendy Mesley holding a microphone there -- right next to a CBC camera flashing its little red light. Last Sunday, some of the old pre-perky Mesley came back. The following is the last part of of Mesley's interview with Jacques Duchesneau, the former Montreal police chief.
Why is it that some in the Liberal Party of Canada are using the disturbing and polarizing language of ageism? It has become open season on the "old guard". Older people seem to be framed as out of touch and constitutionally unable to cope with change. Of course, fresh thinking and new energy is indeed vital to any organization. However, "fresh" doesn't necessarily mean young. To me, "new" and "fresh" has nothing to do with age and everything to do with mindset, values and sincerity of purpose.