jews

This is the highest number of incidents the organization has recorded since 1982.
Incidents involving Muslims more than doubled between 2016 and 2017.
Very sadly, large numbers of Canadians are turning their backs on the principles and values I hold dear, the principles and values of which I am so proud. The principles and values that paved the way for my family, and so many others, to have that better life they craved.
Two year-end surveys of Canadians, respectively conducted by Forum Research Group and by Abacus, provide some potentially useful insights into the relationship between discrimination and prejudice. The surveys remind us that prejudice is uneven, and that some groups are viewed less favourably than others.
When stigma is attached to a community, there appear fewer persons ready to come to the defence of the targeted group. In part, members of other communities see such support as a partisan issue. Others fear that such defence will result in their being associated with the group that is deemed unpopular.
Even those Canadians reporting the highest knowledge about immigration history believe we have always been welcoming.
Trump's scapegoating of Muslims, Hispanics, blacks and other "others" for political gain is exposing a racist ugliness, and dangerously inflaming it. Who knows how big the fire might get? "Never forget" became a Jewish slogan in hopes our collective memory might prevent another Holocaust, but also because we can't forget. It defines us. So as hard as it is to hear Hitler's name all over the news, let it at least remind us why we must stop Trump and all leaders who traffic in racism and xenophobia before such hate defines anyone else.
We have every right to ignore the BDS campaign -- as most of us do. But if we are not going to help Palestinians, the least we can do is allow for peaceful protest and grassroots organisation. We must break from the all too common policy of protecting the strong while denigrating the weak.
In Canada, the term assimilation is especially unpopular. It's associated with painful events in the country's history. But the country's proponents of forced assimilation often underestimated the inevitability of resistance on the part of their targets. The lessons of our history seem lost on many Canadians as it's surprising to learn how many endorse making "others" like "them." Paradoxically, several Canadians that continue to fear assimilation are amongst those most apt to believe that their own cultural survival depends others assimilating.
Since the jihadist terrorist assault on Paris, the most glaring double standard has come into view. It seems that while the victims in France have our sympathy and concern, the Jews murdered by Arabs in Jerusalem and other cities in Israel do not.