HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

jian ghomeshi sexual assault

"For those interested, here is something I'm working on..."
Any idiot knows dry-humping staff is a no-no, and Ghomeshi is a lot of things, but he isn't an idiot. Ghomeshi was a left-wing women's-rights advocate, he had to know that the actions and comments he engaged in were inappropriate -- he just didn't think that applied to him. It was a choice, not ignorance. Intense narcissism is no excuse for wilful ignorance.
The ex-CBC host apologized to a former colleague.
The therapist's letter notes Ghomeshi had met for 61 appointments since Nov. 12, 2014.
She said Crown prosecutors "did the right thing."
The former radio host's second trial was scheduled to begin June 6.
Linda Redgrave said her court experience fueled her desire to help other sexual assault survivors.
There is no one common reaction to sexual assaults. Survivors' behaviours following such traumatic events can vary from minimizing the incident and pretending everything is fine (e.g. kissing and cuddling in the park, or writing gushing love letters, as DuCoutere did following the assault); to suppressing the incident altogether, essentially blocking it from your memory; to blaming yourself, somehow, in an attempt to rationalize the trauma. It is not unusual in my caseload to see women, years after the fact, still believing they were somehow responsible for the incident.
"I was shaken, but tried to hide it."
Many legal definitions of sexual assault, including Canada's, try to balance two things: the rights of the accused to remain innocent until proven guilty, and the rights of the complainants to seek justice in a fair and balanced court of law. However, our laws are strongly biased in favour of the accused because of one little clause.