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Job Hunting

Show your resume to a career coach, and they'll likely highlight some big fails. Some are obvious (a six-page resume can be a snooze to read) while others are a bit more surprising (those catchy buzzwords everyone uses might not be a great idea after all). We asked three career coaches and resume writing experts for the top mistakes they see over and over, and how you can break these bad habits to make your resume stand out from the rest -- in a good way.
Is your resume failing to get the response you're looking for from potential employers? Maybe they're not even reading it.... there are some common resume blunders that can turn employers off even before they get to the sections describing your skills and experience.
Even though you want people to know you are looking for work. No one is going to conduct a search for someone "seeking a job". It is completely understandable to want your network to know you are looking for work. You want your network to look out for you and be aware of your employment status or lack thereof but you are doing yourself a disservice.
Many professionals emphasize networking and strategies to build networks, however, there is little focus on network maintenance. The best networks are the ones we can call on for support when needed. For example, are we comfortable asking for a favour from someone we spoke to once at a party a year ago? In this case, the quality of the relationship is more important than the number of contacts in the address book.
"Oh gimme a break, not another 'results-oriented, hard-working, team player.'" Self-descriptions like these turn up in so many resumes that they don't serve to differentiate candidates anymore. In fact, they have the opposite effect by making the job seeker appear generic and cookie-cutter. Stop trying to describe yourself.
It's not the actual interview questions that cause difficulties for candidates. It's understanding why the interviewer is asking them in the first place. What is it that they really want to know? The information that employers are after is often quite different from the literal answer to the question asked.
Looking for a job after you've had one for a while is like getting back into the dating world too. Not fun, but sometimes you just have to jump in. And just like the elusive great first date, finding a great job feels elusive too. Jobs are tough to find because, in most companies, jobs are already filled before they are posted.
When looking for a new job, timing can be everything. February has more job openings becoming available and fewer applications for them than January. From now through the spring could be the right time to make your move.
How is it that we become outraged by one tweet from a celebrity and not by any number of grave issues and epidemics facing society as a whole? After all, there is certainly no shortage of worthwhile causes to support. One issue that's certainly got my attention is youth homelessness in Canada.
Working retail or serving wasn't exactly what you had planned when you were a little kid but right now it's a great way to earn some cash-sometimes even a lot of cash. If you're willing to work long nights and chat up your customers, serving could earn you lots in tips. If you have some retail experience, get a job in managing. This is great on a resume to show your organizational and teamwork skills.