HuffPost Canada closed in 2021 and this site is maintained as an online archive. If you have questions or concerns, please check our FAQ or contact support@huffpost.com.

job interviews

Wouldn't it be great if you knew exactly what potential employers were going to ask you in a job interview? Well prepared and confident, you could then knock hiring managers dead, wowing them with your wit, experience, and charm. Well, you kind of can.
In a job interview, employers will be looking to see how savvy you are, how confident you are, and how personable you are. There will be some questions about your work experience and skills, of course, but if the prospective employer didn't think you could do the job, they wouldn't waste time interviewing you. What they really want to see is how you handle pressure. How well you can communicate. If they like you. And that decision is made quickly, often in their very first impression.
An interview is a two way street. The company has a void that needs to be filled and the candidate is hoping to land a better career opportunity. In order to stand out the candidate must be asking thought-provoking questions that will not only assist in collecting valuable information but break the ice to distinguish them from all the other applicants.
I'm shocked and amazed by how few people do informational interviews. Hell, a lot of people don't even know what they are. An informational huh? What is that? Well pull up a chair, sonny. You're about to get schooled. Here's what you need to know about informational interviews and how to score one for yourself.
It's not the actual interview questions that cause difficulties for candidates. It's understanding why the interviewer is asking them in the first place. What is it that they really want to know? The information that employers are after is often quite different from the literal answer to the question asked.
And what you should avoid, besides garlic.
The majority of experts (rightfully) focus on the practical stuff: study the company, be prepared for common interview questions, ask questions of your own, be very well groomed, dress appropriately -- the list goes on. That said, here's a next-level tip geared at setting you apart from anyone who's already heeded the above advice.
As a headhunter, I call people who are sitting at their desk already working, and as a recruiter, I get resumes and emails from people seeking employment. The difference between the two is extraordinary. If you are looking for work and wondering why no one is calling or emailing you back, here are the real reasons you aren't getting a job.
Job interviews can be very stressful particularly for university students who haven't had experience in the process but with a few simple tips the job interview process can be significantly more pleasant and successful. In my experience even the best credentials can't make up for an unpleasant or impolite candidate.
Since there is no way to calculate chemistry and charisma, can something as interpersonal as a job interview be reduced to a formula? Sure thing. These simple equations can help take your performance to the next level. Here's what it means.