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job interviews

You can convey your competence and confidence, your job-readiness, to an employer much more impressively with the questions you ask than the ones you answer. Smart questions can demonstrate that you have some knowledge of the industry, and that you're already thinking about how you can contribute to it.
There are quite a few questions that come up in almost every job interview, and one in particular that you are sure to be asked. The best way to ace an interview is tailor your answers to be as specifically relevant as possible to the challenges of the job at hand - especially for the questions that you know are coming.
Once upon a time, you decided to take a few months away from your career to spend time with your new baby, or tend to a sick relative, or start your own business. Perhaps those months turned into years and you now find yourself wanting to return to the workforce. Don't despair. By following the six steps below, you can take control of the back-to-work process and will restart your career in no time.
Look the employer up online. Read their website. See if they are mentioned in articles on other sites or in news stories. Talk to people in your network who may have company or industry knowledge. Think about what the future of the industry is and what the challenges of the job might be.
Recently, my daughter began to come to me for advice. The Junior Child, so named because she is the youngest, called me, her father, to get input on job interview techniques. Job interviews can be intimidating for those who are just entering this hyper competitive job market.
The general consensus among many people is that revealing their true personality can make them seem unlikable or incompetent. However, if you just try to be a robot, then you are guaranteed to achieve very little. As such, it makes more sense to take the risk of exposing your personality instead of hiding behind a mask.
As a former managing partner of a small law firm, some of my students ask me for advice about job interviews. This is the first part of an article offering such tips. There is no particular order to the tips. These tips, though catered to law school graduates, may be helpful to all job seekers.
A better day comes along, and I tell myself that it's not that I'm unwilling to commit, it's that I haven't found my career true love yet. I am unwilling to settle. I'm making progress, improving and learning with each step I take, getting stronger at understanding what I love and what I won't grit my teeth through anymore.
Any way you cut it, the process of hiring employees that are the best fit for your company can be arduous and stressful. And with so many people looking for employment, we can expect that identifying the right candidate for the job will only get more difficult. Here are a few strategies we've been using.