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jordan bateman

There are tax credits for putting your kids in sports or music lessons, for volunteer firefighting, for taking a bus, for fixing up your kitchen, and for joining a search and rescue team. All worthy things, sure, but expensive for taxpayers. Now we're talking about a leftovers tax credit. Where will this trend end?
Video killed the radio star. But it's Peter Fassbender who is about to kill the independent civic politician.
During 10 days of public meetings, special interest groups demanded $18.6 billion from the provincial government. It's 40 per cent of the province's annual budget. It's more than B.C. spends on health care. It's a ridiculous amount of money.
Here's the truth about politician pay. Some are grossly overpaid for the work they do, while some are terribly underpaid. But that distinction is very much in the eye of the beholder.
They're coming first for your devilish Coca-Cola and Pepsi. But they aren't stopping there. They also want taxes on sugary fruit juice (you sinister Sun-Rype suckers!), and anything else that tastes slightly better than water. It won't end -- because big government types truly believe higher taxes can solve every problem -- there's no evidence it will work.
What long-term health benefits would occur if government built $7.5 million in school playgrounds? Or spent $7.5 million cutting waitlists for surgery? Or made sure people had timely access to family physicians? Or improved rural or aboriginal drinking water quality to reduce the dozens of boil water advisories in effect across B.C. right now? Or any of a hundred other ideas.
The annual bonus alone could add up to $95,000.
No more poodles on poles, no more $40,000 TVs, no more leasing empty buildings, no more TransLink vanity projects.
The lack of accountability on many reserves is why the Canadian Taxpayers Federation worked with grassroots band members to push for the new First Nations Financial Transparency Act (FNFTA). Among other things, the law requires chiefs and councillors to disclose their pay publicly.
City bureaucracies are a bit like junk drawers -- they need a good purging every once in a while.