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Joseph Boyden

Recently an APTN investigation called famous novelist Joseph Boyden's indigenous ancestry into question. The broader issues raised in his situation are what drew my attention - issues such as distinguishing who has lived experience as an indigenous person.
When Boyden said in a recent interview that he should step back and let more deeply-rooted members of the community speak on its behalf -- and that he had become 'a bit too big' of a deal, my immediate reaction was a shrug. His apologies have felt a little flaccid, while criticisms have become strengthened and more expansive concerning ideas and identity.
This conversation might be new to you, but it's always been relevant and ongoing, and it's often a reaction of something your people have caused. It's often complicated by outsider intrusion and historical erasure.
Joseph Boyden, author of The Orenda, is a figurehead in native literature and was recently scrutinized for his lack of proof concerning his native roots. The questions his identity raises are interesting and necessary, but if he's unwilling to have those conversations publicly, he's holding up progress.
The terrible truth is that there is often no justice for women who speak out about sexual assault and sexual harassment, and as such it can take every ounce of will for women to honour their own experiences and not be silenced. The Boyden letter takes that juggernaut of misogyny and with the weight of authority crushes it down on those students who lodged complaints against Steven Galloway.
The videos were written by acclaimed author Joseph Boyden.
"This is not a First Nations problem. I think that some politicians like to say it's their problem not ours, but this a Canadian problem."
Winnipeg has frequently been accused of being Canada's most racist city.