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justin trudeau liberal party

As Conservative Leader Stephen Harper announced the official call for a general election on Sunday morning, Liberal Leader
Talk about an unusual approach to party fundraising.
Should we trust a political leader who does not understand basic economic notions? This question is becoming more and more relevant as the leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, Justin Trudeau, keeps making absurd statements about the economy. He also seems not to understand that government spending does not create wealth and that to stimulate the economy sustainably, we must do the opposite. There's not much harm in it as long as Mr. Trudeau cannot act on his absurd beliefs. But if the Liberal Party of Canada ever comes to power again, these ideas could become a threat to Canadians' economic security. Can we afford to take such a risk?
Justin Trudeau’s first policy convention as Liberal leader kicks off in Montreal Thursday. Three thousand delegates and paid
2012-04-27-mediabitesreal.jpg Justin Trudeau thinks Canada's Senate has become irreparably corrupted through "extreme patronage and partisanship," and is trying to set a good example by opting-out of at least half of that equation. It's an exceedingly open question if Canadians even want the sort of reformed, "effective" Senate Trudeau's promising amid such great fanfare. The closer you look at the whole plan, in fact, the closer Trudeau's fix begins to resemble the classic solution in search of a problem.
Anyone who actually analyzes the dramatic uptick in Liberal fortunes, both in the polls and in voters in the recent byelections might conclude that there is in fact an ongoing, well thought out incremental strategy which may well position Justin Trudeau as a real threat to Harper in the next federal election.
I have decided to return to my profession as a lawyer and mediator, to continue working for the Matawa Tribal Council, and to step down as the Member of Parliament for Toronto Centre. This has been a difficult personal decision. I was first elected to Parliament in 1978, and was deeply honoured to have had the chance to serve again these past five years, as well as to lead the Liberal Party at a time of change and renewal. Helping to improve the life of First Nations people has been a long-standing commitment of mine, and this opportunity to serve is one I felt I could not decline.
Justin Trudeau has been Liberal leader for more than a month but it appears he could use a hand in question period. The new
Justin Trudeau claimed the Liberal Party of Canada leadership in a resounding victory, and if we believe the polls, Canadians are open to supporting their Liberal candidates in the next election. However, there is a lot of work to be done if the Liberals want more than just a temporary splash in the polls.
On April 6, Justin Trudeau will make his arguments to be the new leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. The 41-year-old politico