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Keystone XL Pipeline

Dear Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, as barely one year has elapsed since the historical COP21 agreement to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), we are deeply shaken by the federal government's approval of the proposed extension of the Trans Mountain Pipeline and the replacement of Enbridge's Line 3.
I knew it was coming. At some point, Donald Trump would resurrect the Keystone XL pipeline, using his own dark magic to drag its lifeless corpse from where Barack Obama laid it to rest nearly a year and a half ago. The question now for Canada is, what is Justin Trudeau going to do about it?
Looks like money traders still see the loonie as a petro-currency.
There are issues requiring tough decisions that a few selfies will not provide him with enough cover nor will they help him to change the channel to better issues or allow for better optics. His recent foot in mouth moment over his comments on Fidel Castro is just this past weekend's storm cloud. We also have other storm clouds developing on the horizon.
Keystone and Trans-Mountain put together might not be enough pipeline.
After months of anti-trade rhetoric from the next American president, Donald Trump, Canada must ensure that our trade deals are respected, and push for even more free trade between our two countries. Free trade -- and NAFTA in particular -- has been so beneficial to both Canada and the U.S. that common sense will have to prevail.
When Justin Trudeau said that "Canada has no closer friend, partner, and ally than the United States," in his statement responding to the election of Donald Trump as the 45th President, he was right. But while Trudeau extolled how this should mean collaboration with Trump, being the kind of climate leader the world needs is going to mean Trudeau standing up to Trump, not sitting down with him.
It sometimes sounds as though pipeline proponents are the true environmentalists among us. Commentary in favour of the pipelines has followed suit with generous explanations of our current needs and the realities of energy consumption. They ask: are opponents of the pipelines in denial about our current reliance on fossil fuels? And if these bleeding hearts do admit that we do need fossil fuels to power our country, are they comfortable importing Saudi oil forever? I believe that such questions willfully miss the point.
If the pipelines are not approved, Alberta will suffer a huge fall, perhaps a kind of collapse. The Canadian economy will take a hit. But it will also turn us away from the unsustainable direction fostered by the last government. New, cleaner industries more befitting an educated, technologically advanced Canada will continue to be developed and in time produce economic growth. They won't make us rich right now, or in this election cycle, but it is a certainty that the alternative energy sector is not going away; in fact, it is a certainty that it will take over.
With the December Paris climate agreement, leaders and experts from around the world showed they overwhelmingly accept that human-caused climate change is real and the need to curb emissions. In light of this, I don't get the current brouhaha over Kinder Morgan, Keystone XL, Northern Gateway or the Energy East pipelines.