kitchener-waterloo

The Facebook group "Bags To Sleeping Mats" are creatively crocheting.
For decades, Kitchener Centre has voted with the party that takes Ontario, and the party that can secure Ontario is on the path to power.
In an election year, anything goes: While Waterloo Region council convenes on March 4 to vote on a $550-million contract for the work and materials for the project (which has technically already started), the first candidate to file his nomination papers for October's Waterloo mayoral contest has decided to run on an anti-LRT platform... and he's finding supporters.
When Raymond Laflamme first met Howard Burton, the founding executive director of the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical
For most of us, the idea of a two-hour commute, twice daily, is nuts. But both Rodgers and Samuell have their reasons for taking on that heroic morning haul: They love where they work and they love where they play.
If the Toronto-K-W region is ever to fully reach its potential as a technology supercluster, functioning fluidly as a single, contiguous innovation sector, the ability to move human capital between the two nodes is essential, be it employees, investors or entrepreneurs.
Kitchener-Waterloo is already well established as a bastion of innovation. It's already actively adding places where people will want to live, work and play -- the three elements that define a cluster in a place of innovation. Toronto, on the other hand, has yet to truly establish a centralized, cohesive community where technological innovation can flourish.
Within a year of the 2011 provincial election, the Ontario Liberals could regain their majority government and deal Tim Hudak's