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language

People often ask me how I learned 15 languages. What's my secret? Read ahead and you'll find out.
One of the biggest myths I have come across though is that extroverts are the better language learners. I do not believe at all that you need to be an extrovert to learn a language. Language learning isn't about your personality type, rather it comes down to whether or not you possess the three keys.
The obvious question one may consider is why would someone do this? Is it an attempt to seem well-travelled? Sophisticated? Cultured? If so it could well be in vain as I can tell you that there are many people with English accents who are not well-travelled, sophisticated or cultured
The biggest benefit of speaking languages I've seen in my career is that it increased the opportunities that came my way. You do have to have other things working for you too, of course. You have to have other skills, like knowledge of a specific sector or market, the ability to do business and the ability to be a reliable, energetic person in any number of fields.
The quick answer on how to achieve fluency in a language is that it is a matter of motivation. Having seen a lot of language learners, I am convinced that motivated learners achieve fluency, and unmotivated learners don't.
Apart from this legal debate, let's analyze the insecurities of Pakistani-Canadians in terms of not recognizing Punjabi as mother tongue of Punjabi Pakistani Canadians: First, they don't want to count themselves with Punjabi Sikhs and Hindus. Secondly, they declare Urdu as their Muslim language.
Good language learners notice what is happening in a language. They notice the sounds, the structure and the vocabulary of the language. They notice as they listen and read. They notice when they use the language. How can we train ourselves in the ability to notice in order to become good language learners?
Making mistakes when speaking or writing a new language is not the same as making other kinds of mistakes, at least not to me. Making mistakes in language learning is not only necessary, it is a good sign. If you are not making mistakes, you are not trying hard enough to use the language.
Have you been studying a language for a while? Are you still afraid to speak? Follow the Language Learner's Manifesto and become confident and fluent in your chosen language. Repeat the following mantra daily: "My goal is to be fluent. I can be fluent. My goal is not to be perfect. My goal is to be fluent. I can be fluent and still make mistakes."
I'm enjoying carrying on an affair with you and really don't expect anything in return. But I know from experience with other language affairs that I get more out of my relationship than I put in. The rewards are personal, cultural and even professional. The rewards are immense.