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legal

The Canadian company is suing Cineworld for backing out of a deal.
But the premier has not responded to dozens of requests for help.
Most families will experience some level of drama or conflict after the death of a family member. However, for some families, the death of a parent, sibling, or other close family member, can spark a dispute that results in expensive, protracted litigation and causes the breakdown of family relationships.
Alternate dispute resolution ("ADR") has been on the rise as one of the primary ways to bring a dispute to resolution. Rather than spending significant time and money to litigate a case, the recent trend sees the increased use of ADR processes, such as mediation or arbitration, in the negotiation of a settlement outside of the courtroom.
According to a recent study, fully one-third of Canadians will experience a legal problem within any given three-year period. This includes divorcing parents needing child support, small business owners trying to make a living, homeowners facing unscrupulous contractors, hard-working Canadians in conflict with their employers.
Marineland has launched lawsuits targeting myself, former orca trainer Christine Santos and animal care supervisor Jim Hammond. My latest round of legal bills totaled more than I will earn in this year -- $100,000. Our lawsuits are shining examples of the urgent need for the anti-SLAPP legislation that is Bill 52: Protection of Public Participation Act. It is unbearable to think that this historic piece of legislation -- as it is currently written -- will not apply to the very people who have largely inspired it. Why is the province turning its back on us and leaving us behind? Where is the procedural fairness for those of us who are already proceeding with unfair cases before the courts in Ontario?
Every time I tried to communicate with the father of my child, he turned it into an argument, chastised me, tried to humiliate me, or walked away. I felt helpless trying to have a decent and cordial conversation regarding the needs of our child with him.
Bringing and defending will challenges is at the core of an estate litigation practice. As discussed in Part I of this series
With an aging Canadian population, will challenges are becoming increasingly common. Historically, we typically saw larger estates becoming the subject of such challenges. More and more, however, we are now seeing even modest estates becoming the subject of such challenges.
An advisable way to approach extracting issues of capacity with an elderly individual is through delicate conversation. It is important to avoid offending clients who may be uncomfortable, but it can be crucial to proper estate planning. Sometimes, apparent symptoms of incapacity can in fact result from cultural differences between client and lawyer.